Toilet Water Is Holy - Rethinking Our Relationship To The Divine

Here's a thought about water on this very wet (at least here in Denver) day.

The Biblical creation story (which Jews around the world read about in the Torah this week), walks us through God's creation of the world. It describes the formation of almost everything - from bugs to babies, from food to creepy crawly things to college football (OK, it's not exactly in there but it should be) - it's all there.

However, until it was pointed out to me, I never realized following. There was one thing which wasn't created in this story. Water.

Later God says "Let there be....light, land, vegetation...." God, however, never says "let there be water." It was already there.

Water, the primordial soup, is where the universe begins. It's where existence begins. It's where life begins, and it's where God shows up and begins to create. Makes sense. 

After all, the universe is mostly water.

The earth, also primarily H2O.

The air? Ditto.

You an me? Yep. The flesh suit we call our body is actually just a big wet suit (seems the older I get the bigger the wet suit gets too).

In the end, water isn't part of creation. Water is creation.

If we are going to solve our water problems, overcome the pending water crisis and turn this ship around - we are going to have to think differently about water.

If it's merely a commodity, we'll waste it.

If it's simply a precious resource, we'll abuse it.

However, if water is something deeper, something divine, then perhaps we have a chance.

As much as we need water policy, infrastructure, management and governance reform, perhaps what we really need is to reform and reframe our thinking about water.

Water isn't just a practical issue. It's not only an existential issue. At it's core water is a spiritual issue.  Holy water isn't simply what you sprinkle for Baptism or dunk within, in the Mikvah (Jewish Baptism). Holy water is what you drink, what you water the lawn with or what you pour down the sink.

In the beginning there was water. However, let's keep it going, keep it flowing, making sure the beginning isn't the end. 

The Divine may not be water, but in the end, water is certainly divine.

The Aqua Rabbi