The Biblepreneur (by Assaf Luxembourg)

 

Throughout my professional journey in the past decade, moving from non-profits to Government, to private sector, from working with start-ups and entrepreneurs to large corporations, then back to “start-up land”, and above all – building my own business — I have noticed and gathered various insights on today’s world of work and on-demand economy. So, I decided to share some of them with the community.

This time: Biblepreneur: Unseized Opportunity?

New pressing need

I get to work with a lot of young professionals and international talents, both in Israel and around the world. It is those lessons-learned from these recurring and on-going interactions, together with insights from my own journey, that led me to develop my “business unit manifesto”, which is described all across this blog.

A new world of work has definitely emerged, which is both scary and exciting. It contains both challenges and opportunities. I believe that today, the power is absolutely in the individual’s hands, not the organization. In the employee’s hands, not the employer. More than in the past, I assume, our employers do not run our careers for us - we run them ourselves. This requires an entrepreneurial state-of-mind that is much deeper than just start-ups. For me, this is “Start-Up Nation 2.0.”

I also believe that by large numbers, young professionals are always interested in more inspiration and guidance for their journey, with regards to these issues (myself included). And to be honest, there aren’t too many good ones to find, which is probably why the same names, sources and ideas keep coming back all the time.

Ancient guiding source

There is, though, one unique source that contains many stories and pragmatic career and life lessons, which empower the audience to take control, think entrepreneurial, not be afraid, dare, dig deep, learn, discover itself, find purpose, persist, develop, grow, and eventually - increase the chance for success and meaningful life.

That source is none other than the Bible. Together with the Mishna, the Gmara, and other sources from Jewish heritage and wisdom - the abundance of life lessons which are so relevant to young professionals today is just incredible.

However, these epic stories and the universal lessons learned from them seem so far away from the everyday deliberations, dilemmas, struggles and challenges that so many young professionals around the world deal with.

Other than the fact that this is a sad truth - is this also an unseized opportunity?

Unseized opportunity?

From a “Jewish world” perspective: How come this is still an untapped resource for this new pressing need? With all the struggles that Jewish communities face nowadays by trying to be more relevant to young professionals - how come almost no one is adding value to them with regards to these aspects, and through this source of wisdom, at scale, and by that - make their Jewish identity meaningful again?

From an Israeli-Diaspora perspective: How come so many educators, community activists and program managers do not realize that “Start-Up Nation” will not be “cool” forever, and that we have to add value in order to successfully create a meaningful connection between Israel and the next generation of global world Jewry?

From a Jewish-Christian-Israeli perspective: How come we did not yet advance from the political support dimension, to one that takes the phrase “a light unto the nations” and actually does something about it, in practice?

From an Israel-global perspective: How come no one is taking a leading role in that space where young professionals meet both ancient Jewish wisdom and modern Israel, in a way that actually helps them? How come no one is claiming the position of “The Gary Vaynerchuk or Simon Sinek of the Jewish world”?

Wouldn’t it be cool if…

I recently discussed all this with my friend, Rabbi Baruch Halevi. Baruch is an inspiring person. He is a Rabbi, who served in various synagogues in the United States for fifteen years, and introduced all kinds of innovations and entrepreneurial thinking into his community. He even wrote a book about it - Revolution of Jewish Spirit. He is also a social entrepreneur, who started a cannabis company (seriously!), as well as a business development organization promoting Israeli high-tech in the United States’ Midwest, and teaches Judaism through these lenses.

So, we began brainstorming asking the following questions:

  • Wouldn’t it be cool if we connect the Bible, Jewish values, practice, traditions and wisdom with the areas of today’s world of work, business, entrepreneurship, innovation and career development?

  • Wouldn’t it be cool if we helped entrepreneurs, innovators and young professionals by adding value to their journey through Jewish wisdom and heritage?

  • Wouldn’t it be cool if we begin to explore the Start-Up Nation through this lens of Jewish values, beliefs and practice?

Wouldn’t it be cool if we start working on the Biblepreneur?

See Also: Discovering Diamonds In The Start-Up Nation by Rabbi Baruch Halevi